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ERIC Number: ED331053
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Mar
Pages: 27
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Writing across the Disciplines: Where Do We Go from Here?
Comprone, Joseph J.
The answers to five questions concerning writing across the disciplines can help to define useful connections between literacy theory and writing across the curriculum classroom practice. First, the experiences of a director of writing programs at the University of Louisville who also taught English at the National University of Singapore, as well as an informal survey of courses in the United States, indicate that educators are not asking themselves the right questions as writing is moved across the disciplines. Second, a clearer and more complex understanding of literacy can help educators ask more useful questions. Third, recent theory provides strategies for combining monologic and dialogic perspectives on literacy. The concepts of heteroglossia and cognitive stereoscopy describe language's potential to bring together in the act of expression multiple social and individual perspectives. Fourth, questions phrased as binary opposition must be transformed into "both-and" rather than "either-or" questions. Fifth, writers become "rhetorically consciousness" when they are able to enter a writing context and define the relationships among the various structures within it. An example from technical writing (in which rhetoric and document design are put together) shows that sometimes the most complex theories of literacy are most clearly represented in functional rather than literacy texts, and it is within those functional contexts that the need for sound rhetorical analysis of context becomes most apparent. (Forty references are attached.) (RS)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Educational Issues; Writing Contexts
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Conference on College Composition and Communication (42nd, Boston, MA, March 21-23, 1991).