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ERIC Number: ED330484
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Apr
Pages: 11
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Young Children's Response to Criticism: Self-Conceptions and Trait Thinking.
Heyman, Gail D.
A total of 107 children of 5 and 6 years participated in interactive scenarios in which mastery experiences were pitted against external criticism. The 39 percent of children whose positive assessments were undermined by the criticism were more likely than other children to make broad negative inferences from specific information. A large proportion of these children interpreted their performance as reflecting negatively on important traits, including their goodness. In addition, these children were more likely than others to make stable and global judgments concerning the goodness of others. This study provides evidence suggesting that children who have just started school have evaluative self-conceptions that are motivationally relevant. The study also provides evidence that the way in which these children think about general goodness is related to their motivational responses in the face of criticism. Finally, the study provides evidence that at least some children of this age are capable of processing information in the achievement context in active and highly sophisticated ways. At its broadest level, the study suggests that self-conceptions and motivation are related early in development, but the domain of relevant self-conceptions may change as children mature. (RH)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Moral Reasoning
Note: Paper presented at the Biennial Meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development (Seattle, WA, April 18-20, 1991).