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ERIC Number: ED329384
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Nov-7
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
Middle Grade Students of Iris County: A Descriptive Study from Southern Appalachia.
Phelps, Margaret S.; And Others
Sixth, seventh, and eighth grade students (N=301) from a rural county in Tennessee (Iris County is a pseudonym) completed a Rural School Success Inventory (RSSI) and the Learning Styles Inventory (LSI). The study explored differences between low Socioeconomic Status (SES) students and middle/high SES students. The RSSI provided information about numerous student and family characteristics including educational levels of parents, employment characteristics of parents, family activities, family economics, physical characteristics of homes, substance abuse, previous school experiences, school success, educational aspirations, friendships, personal aspirations, and religious practices. Cumulative frequencies and percentages were grouped by SES as determined by free and reduced lunch status. A chi-square comparison was made on each item of the RSSI. There were no differences between the learning styles of the poor SES and middle/high SES students. Some conclusions of the study were: (1) poor students have parents with less education, blue collar jobs, less financial security, and lower levels of concern about school performance; (2) their older siblings are often school dropouts; (3) the family functions less as a unit in leisure activities and is less active in religious activities; and (4) poor students make lower grades and are more likely to be retained in grade. Before intervention strategies are addressed, further research is needed to determine which of those differences are directly related to achievement and school success and which have few or no educational implications. (KS)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Appalachia; Tennessee
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference on Appalachia (5th, Lexington, KY, November 2-3, 1990).