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ERIC Number: ED328810
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Aug
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Patterns of Behavior in Family Conflict: A Systems View.
Brennan, Patricia A.; And Others
Observations of conflictual family interaction have revealed that several distinctive behavior patterns tend to occur during the course of a family dispute. Patterns such as negative reciprocity, positive reciprocity, and coercion have been described and utilized as predictors of marital satisfaction and parent-child relations. This study examined the relationship between verbal family interaction patterns and reported child behavior problems. Subjects were 70 nonclinic families who participated in 10-minute videotaped family discussions as part of an extensive study of marital conflict. These discussions were encoded according to verbal content and classified on the basis of two systems view approaches--one a holistic descriptive method and the other a moment-to-moment analysis of the interaction over time. Classification according to the holistic approach yielded several distinct patterns of positive and negative family interactions. These patterns included: couple positive reciprocity, family positive reciprocity, one person highly positive, couple negative reciprocity, family negative reciprocity, one person highly negative, child coercion, and parent coercion. The moment-to-moment time analysis also tested for the presence of coercion. Child coercion was then examined in relation to parent reports of behavior problems on the Achenbach Child Behavior Checklist. Child coercion patterns detected by either the holistic or the moment-to-moment method of research were found to be significantly related to externalizing behaviors and aggressive behavior problems in children. (ABL)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Family Systems Theory
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (98th, Boston, MA, August 10-14, 1990).