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ERIC Number: ED328205
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1991-Feb
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Relationship of Cognitive Style to Academic Performance among Dental Students.
Linder, Frederic; And Others
Studies have suggested that field independent (FI) dental dents perform better in pre-clinical laboratory courses than field dependent (FD) students. A study was conducted to determine the relationship of cognitive learning style to academic performance with 66 second year dental students at Virginia Commonwealth University (Richmond). A brief demographic questionnaire and the Group Embedded Figures Test (GEFT) were administered to the students who had completed three pre-clinical courses containing laboratory components which required demonstration of psychomotor skills. Pre-clincial grades based on laboratory projects requiring pscychomotor skills were also gathered. Results indicated that: (1) students as a whole were field independent; and (2) there were no statistically significant gender, race, or ethnic differences concerning cognitive style. However, a statistically significant relationship existed between the Group Embedded Figures Test scores and preclinical course grades, and also between student handedness (right versus left hand dominance) and cognitive style. Students who were ranked upper third of the class by course grades were the most field independent learners. Right handed students were more field independent than left handed students. Dental educators can identify FD students through the GEFT and institute program changes to meet their learning needs. Seven references and one figure are included. (Author/LPT)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Group Embedded Figures Test; Virginia Commonwealth University
Note: Paper Presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Educational Research Association (Boston, MA, February 1991).