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ERIC Number: ED327719
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Oct
Pages: 44
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
What Do Workers Have To Say? Skills & Technological Change.
Heitner, Keri L.; And Others
A survey examined workers' perspectives on skills usage and the effects of technological change in the workplace, specifically in three trades: metalworking machining, automotive repair, and graphic arts/printing. Responses to interview questions asked during site visits to shops in Hampden and Hampshire Counties (Massachusetts) were incorporated into the survey design and content. A total of 209 surveys from respondents in participating shops employing under 100 production workers or line personnel were analyzed. Findings showed that a majority of workers across all three trade areas indicated more or much more usage of high technology skills (computer data entry, operation of computer controlled machinery, computer programming) in the year 2000. Workers affirmed that changes in technology will require greater math usage and greater usage and higher levels of reading skills on the job. The majority had attended at least one upgrading course and strongly agreed that they wanted to advance their skills. Most saw usage of problem-solving skills increasing. Recommendations for policy changes focused on the importance of basic skills; importance of technical skills; curriculum restructuring; worker participation in training design; equity and access issues; and development of apprenticeship models. Issues requiring further research were raised. (23 references; 17 tables; 5 graphs) (YLB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: Office of Vocational and Adult Education (ED), Washington, DC.
Authoring Institution: Hampden County Employment and Training Consortium, Springfield, MA.
Identifiers: Massachusetts (Hampden County); Massachusetts (Hampshire County)
Note: A Project CREATE/Machine Action Project. For related documents, see CE 056 736 and CE 056 802.