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ERIC Number: ED326832
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Aug
Pages: 24
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Impact of Health and Fitness-Related Behavior on Quality of Life.
Woodruff, Susan I.; Conway, Terry L.
While the relationships between health behavior and health status and between health status and perceived quality of life have received some attention, the association between health behaviors and quality of life has not been determined. The primary objective of this study was to assess the effects of health behaviors on quality of life that are independent of health status. A sample of approximately 5,000 randomly selected United States Navy personnel was split into halves and analyses performed on each to establish the replicability of the findings. At step one of a multiple regression procedure, health status variables were forced into the equation; next, health behavior variables were entered. As expected, the block of health status variables was significantly related to quality of life: self-assessed health and fitness status and lower reporting of physical symptoms accounted for 16% and 18% of the variance in quality of life for the two subsamples. After controlling for health status, two behavioral measures made unique contributions to the prediction of quality of life: behaviors related to avoiding unnecessary risks as a driver or pedestrian and avoiding or minimizing accidents. Wellness maintenance behaviors also were associated with quality of life in one subsample. After controlling for health status, health behavior measures contributed an additional 11% and 6% of the explained variance in quality of life for the two subsamples. The results suggest that health behaviors influence quality of life independently of health status. (Author)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (98th, Boston, MA, August 10-14, 1990).