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ERIC Number: ED326824
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Aug
Pages: 39
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Perceived Social Support and Psychological Well-Being in Working Mothers.
Pakalns, Gail
The psychological benefits of employment may be particularly reduced for working mothers by the stresses of parenting young children. This study was designed to investigate specific relations between three sources of perceived support (spouse, extended family, friend) and five aspects of experienced psychological health (tension, depression, irritability, fatigue, and well-being) in 115 married, high-achieving, full-time working mothers of preschoolers from the New York Metropolitan Area. Perceived social support from the extended family was measured by a modified version of the Perceived Social Support--Family scale, perceived spouse support was measured by a modified version of the Perceived Social Support--Family scale, and perceived friend support was measured by the Perceived Social Support--Friends scale. The five aspects of psychological health investigated were measured using scales of the Profile of Mood States: Depression (depression-dejection scale); Tension (tension-anxiety scale); Irritability (anger-hostility scale); Fatigue (fatigue-inertia scale; and Well-Being (vigor-activity scale). Sociodemographic information was collected through a Personal Data Questionnaire. Canonical correlation analysis revealed that 26% of the variation in distress and well-being was accounted for by a composite of perceived social support strongly related to spouse support and moderately related to extended family support. Surprisingly, friend support was unrelated to the psychological variables. The relation found was not influenced by a range of sociodemographic variables. (Author/NB)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Psychological Association (98th, Boston, MA, August 10-14, 1990).