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ERIC Number: ED326355
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1990-Oct-19
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Study of Characteristics Profiling At-Risk Students and Influences Impacting Their Rural Environment.
Reddick, Thomas L.; Peach, Larry E.
The purpose of this study was to identify characteristics of at-risk students and review certain circumstances that affect their decisions to leave or stay in school. Mail survey responses were collected from 272 students (out of a total of 300) in 15 rural Tennessee high schools. The subjects were identified by their guidance counselors as being at risk of dropping out. At-risk students frequently have been shown to be older males, often from low socioeconomic backgrounds, who possess low basic academic skills. The mother's educational background and her aspirations for her children's educational attainment strongly influence their decisions regarding school. A majority of at-risk students live with their mothers in a single-parent home. More than 70% said their birth parents were divorced. Some 47% stated they had jobs. More than half preferred a job to staying in school. Eighty-six percent revealed that they consume alcohol on an average of four times a week and 73% used other drugs regularly. Almost half of the students had experienced some problems in school, and more than 33% had appeared in juvenile court before age 15. More than half had experienced physical abuse. Most did not involve themselves in extra-school activities and 61% said they did not believe that a high school education was important. Effective dropout prevention programs use a combination of mentorships, counseling, remediation, social services, and other incentives to keep students in school. Early identification and personalized intervention programs are essential to disrupting the cycle that leaves many students dysfunctional in today's complex society. (TES)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Tennessee
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Conference of the National Social Science Association (Houston, TX, October 19, 1990).