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ERIC Number: ED286272
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987-Apr
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: N/A
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Contextual Differences in Effective Schooling in Louisiana.
Teddlie, Charles; And Others
Now that the school effectiveness field is maturing, more refined and contextually sensitive observations about schools are possible. This paper focuses on socioeconomic status (SES) as one social context variable demonstrating substantial predictive power in numerous school improvement studies. Instead of viewing middle class behavior as superior and lower class behavior as deficient, this paper explores how human variation may be exploited for the enrichment of all members of society. To this end, data from third-grade classes in 12 urban, suburban, and rural Louisiana school randomly selected districts were gathered during the 1982-83 school year, and six groups of schools were identified: (1) middle-SES effective schools, (2) middle-SES typical schools, (3) middle-SES ineffective schools, (4) low-SES effective schools, (5) low-SES typical schools, and (6) low-SES ineffective schools. In one stage of this study, nine matched pairs of schools selected by regression techniques were examined. While findings disclosed definite similarities between effective middle- and low-SES schools, interesting dissimilarities were also revealed. Compared to their middle-SES counterparts, low-SES effective schools emphasize present expectations; offer more external rewards; hire initiator--instead of manager-principals; buffer schools from negative community influences when more positive outreach fails; hire younger, more idealistic teachers; and concentrate on basic skills. Included are 3 tables and 13 references. (MLH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners; Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Effective Schools Research; Louisiana
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Ameri