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ERIC Number: ED284357
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987-Apr-21
Pages: 19
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Sex Role, Self-Esteem, and Leadership Characteristics of Male and Female Teachers and Administrators.
Barrett, Diane L.; Bieger, George R.
The incongruity between the stereotypical female role and the leader role accounts for the scarcity of female administrators in the United States. The solution seems to be androgyny, or the mixing of masculine and feminine characteristics. A recent survey sampled 28 male teachers, 25 female teachers, 27 male administrators, and 22 female administrators from central Pennsylvania to assess their sex role, self-esteem, and leadership qualities, and to determine what impact sex role has on self-esteem and leadership. The anonymous questionnaires employed the Short Bem Sex-Role Inventory, the Coopersmith Self-Esteem Inventory, and the Leadership Opinion Questionnaire. The survey results revealed that fewer female teachers were androgynous than hypothesized; more female administrators were androgynous than expected; more female teachers were feminine than expected; administrators scored higher on self-esteem than teachers; relationships existed between self-esteem and masculinity, self-esteem and age, and self-esteem and years of service; administrators of either gender scored higher than teachers of either gender in masculinity; androgynous and masculine subjects showed a higher degree of structure than undifferentiated subjects; and androgynous groups showed higher scores on the consideration dimension than all other groups. (RG)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners; Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: American Association of School Administrators; Bem Sex Role Inventory; Coopersmith Self Esteem Inventory; Leadership Opinion Questionnaire; Pennsylvania
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Washington, DC, April 20-24, 1987).