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ERIC Number: ED284355
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987-Mar
Pages: 29
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Distribution of Salary Increments and Its Effect on Teacher Retention.
Jacobson, Stephen L.
Using personnel files provided by New York's state education department, this study examines and compares teacher retention rates in relation to region and gender from 1974 through 1984 in school districts using alternative practices of internal salary distribution. A total of 57 school districts from 2 regions of the state were included in the study, 15 districts were from a rural, 4-county region and 42 were from a suburban county outside New York City. Each region's districts were categorized according to changes during 1974-84 in relative attractiveness of salaries offered entry level (maximum 3 years experience), mid-career (9-11 years district experience), and senior teachers (minimum 17 years district experience). Although data reveal positive correlations between district retention rates and salary improvements in both regions, regional and gender-related differences exist in teacher labor market behavior. In the wealthier, suburban region, districts that have improved the attractiveness of salaries paid to mid-career teachers have the highest retention rates, whereas the highest retention rates in the rural region are among districts experiencing little change in their salaries' relative attractiveness. Analysis of gender-related differences in labor market behavior indicates that female teachers are more responsive to salary improvements that males, particularly male teachers in rural districts. A two-page reference list and seven data tables are appended. (Author/CJH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers; Teachers; Administrators; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: New York
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Washington, DC, April 20-24, 1987).