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ERIC Number: ED284347
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1987-Apr-24
Pages: 30
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
ED QUEST: A Model Procedure for Futures Planning in Educational Organizations.
Adams, Charles F.
Most educational planning models are weak at identifying future events and assessing their impact on education. At best they assume a surprise-free future in which present trends continue unabated and interrelationships among social, economic, political, and technological forces stay the same. The ED QUEST model was developed to ameliorate these weaknesses and provide administrators with a useful futures approach to educational planning. The model uses group process during a few day-long sessions over a two- or three-week period, wherein participants analyze major environmental trends affecting the organization and assess strategic options. This paper describes the eight primary activities in the ED QUEST process. The first major activity is to identify the planning team, appoint a facilitator, and hold a briefing meeting. The second task involves developing a future prospects notebook with relevant journal articles, trend charts, and other forecasting aids. During the first session, planners deliberate on the organization's mission, identify indicators to assess the organization's performance, and discuss major organizational strengths and weaknesses. After posting results, the teams focus on examining future trends, using the Delphi technique. The second session involves analyzing the plausibility and impact of various scenarios and "matching" strategic options to deal with them. ED QUEST will produce little of lasting organizational significance unless results are incorporated into the institution's planning process. (MLH)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Strategic Management
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (Washington, DC, April 20-24, 1987). Some figures contain light, broken type.