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ERIC Number: ED255790
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Jun-19
Pages: 60
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Preventive Detention of Juveniles. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Juvenile Justice of the Committee on the Judiciary. United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, Second Session. Oversight Hearing to Review the Recent Supreme Court Decision Relating to the Pretrial Detention of Juvenile Offenders. Serial No. J-98-145.
Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.
This document contains prepared statements and witness testimony from the Congressional hearing on the pretrial detention of juveniles. The opening statement of Senator Arlen Specter, subcommittee chairman, is presented, focusing on the concerns arising from the Supreme Court decision in the case of Schall versus Martin (New York) which supports the constitutionality of preventive detention for juveniles. Testimony is presented from Martin Guggenheim, New York University Law School; Lenore Gittis, Attorney-in-Charge, Juvenile Rights Division, New York Legal Aid Society and Janet Fink, Assistant Attorney-in-Charge; Richard Lewis, District Attorney, Dauphin County, Pennsylvania; the Honorable Margaret Driscoll, Superior Court Judge, Bridgeport, Connecticut; Larry Schall, Juvenile Law Center, Philadelphia and Dolores Lee, Philadelphia; and Eric Warner, Juvenile Offense Bureau, Office of the Bronx District Attorney. Topics covered include the lack of adequate, appropriate facilities for detaining juveniles, the principle of the presumption of innocence, due process protection, and implications of the Schall decision for future social policy. (MCF)
Publication Type: Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Policymakers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on the Judiciary.
Identifiers: Congress 98th; Detention; Juvenile Justice System; New York; Schall v Martin; Supreme Court
Note: Some pages are marginally legible due to small print.