NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED255579
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1985-Mar
Pages: 38
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Relationship between Response Pattern Aberrance and Course Performance in Math Placement.
Chatman, Steven P.
University-level mathematics placement examinations might yield summary measures that are differentially accurate due to individual differences in the recall of previously-learned material. In particular, test scores in algebra and trigonometry may be subject to sporadic recall of solution procedures, resulting in aberrant response patterns. The potential of the individually-oriented standardized extended caution index (ECI) for contributing to prediction of future mathematics achievement was explored in two studies. The first study was designed to explore the predictive usefulness of the ECI as derived from pre-enrollment algebra and trigonometry exams. Specifically, analyses were designed to determine the ability of ECI to improve the prediction of performance in subsequent college-level mathematics courses. The results provided some evidence that supported the hypothesis of the sporadic recall, but only for trigonometry solution procedures and only for precalculus students. Therefore, a replication of the first study was undertaken to determine whether the marginally significant results were spurious. The results of Experiment 2 did not support the hypothesis of sporadic recall. Based on these two studies, there would appear to be no reason to routinely consider an incoming university student's placement test aberrance, as measured by the ECI, when determining a course placement. (BW)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Extended Caution Index
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (69th, Chicago, IL, March 31-April 4, 1985). This paper is based, in part, on a doctoral dissertation, Texas A & M University, 1984.