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ERIC Number: ED255012
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1985-Apr-3
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Alternative Testing Techniques: Impact and Meaning.
Strum, Irene
More than 50,000 New York City special education students in self-contained classes and resource rooms in grades 2-9 were tested in reading on the California Achievement Test, Form C. Students who had testing modifications recommended on their individualized education programs were tested with the appropriate modification. Among the moderately impaired students in self-contained classes, the positive effect of testing modifications seemed greatest among lowest scoring students. Only three percent more students tested with modifications scored at or above grade level than those tested without modifications, but six percent more who were not tested with modifications scored two or more years below grade level than students tested with modifications. However, it was found that, outside of this study, many students for whom modifications were authorized were tested without them. Frequently principals did not provide a testing environment conducive to alternative testing techniques. Lack of sufficient staff was also a problem. It was concluded that although modifications of tests for handicapped students has generally been accepted, significant problems remain. (CL)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Adapted Tests (for Disabled); New York (New York)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (69th, Chicago, IL, March 31-April 4, 1985).