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ERIC Number: ED254431
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1985-Apr
Pages: 35
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Effects of Teacher Use of Analogies on Achievement of High School Biology Students with Varying Levels of Cognitive Ability and Prior Knowledge.
Burns, Joseph C.; Okey, James R.
This study investigated the effects of analogy-based and conventional lecture-based instructional strategies on the achievement of four classes of high school biology students (N=123). Prior to treatment, students were assessed for cognitive ability and prior knowledge of the analogy vehicle. The analogy-based treatment consisted of teacher lecture and student examination of analogy text, diagrams, and charts comparing target information to an analogous domain. Conventional lecture-based strategies involved didactic teacher presentation of target concepts supplemented with reading assignments from the regular textbook. Findings indicate that: (1) analogy-based instructional methods appear to enhance student performance relative to conventional lecture-based instruction in achievement related to the digestive, nervous, and circulatory system; (2) both concrete and transitional/formal operational students benefited from analogy-based instruction; (3) with both treatments, transitional/formal operational students tended to show higher achievement than concrete operational students; (4) concrete operational students receiving analogy-based instruction scored higher than transitional/formal operational students receiving conventional lecture-based instruction; (5) students who comprehended analogies showed significantly higher achievement over those who did not comprehend them; and (6) the effects related to treatment tended to be more pronounced when comprehension of analogy was high. (Author/JN)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Science Education Research
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Association for Research in Science Teaching (58th, French Lick Springs, IN, April 15-18, 1985).