NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED253891
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Nov
Pages: 24
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The Effects of Dogmatism, Rhetorical Sensitivity and Attitude Valence on Selected Speech Ratings.
Geyerman, Chris B.; Bock, Douglas G.
A study examined the information processing construct of the speech rating error paradigm. Specifically, it tested the hypotheses that (1) attitude valence and dogmatism would interact in such a way that low dogmatic raters would show a positive trait error on the content traits material and analysis; (2) low dogmatic raters would evaluate a speech containing stimuli to which their attitudes are negatively valenced significantly higher than high dogmatics; (3) attitude valence and rhetorical sensitivity would interact in such a way that high rhetorically sensitive raters would show a negative trait error on the content traits of material and analysis; and (4) high rhetorically sensitive raters would show a significant negative leniency error in speech evaluation. Subjects, 83 students from six sections of a public speaking course, completed dogmatism and rhetorical sensitivity scales and evaluated videotaped speeches using the Becker-Bock rating scale. One of the speeches had been prepared in two forms--negatively valanced and positively valanced--and one version was shown to students in three sections of the course, the other to the remaining three sections. Findings supported hypotheses two and four, but not one and three. Dogmatism was found to significantly affect speech evaluation when the rater's attitude toward the speech topic was negatively valanced. In addition, no significant interaction was found between rhetorical sensitivity and attitude valance. The results support the information processing construct and rater error theory. (FL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Rating Error Theory; Speech Evaluation; Theory Development
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Speech Communication Association (70th, Chicago, IL, November 1-4, 1984).