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ERIC Number: ED253689
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1985-Mar-1
Pages: 6
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Training in the '80's: An Economic Perspective.
Klein, Carl
During the last decade, the manufacture of commodities has become increasingly simple, and as a result, has increasingly been exported from the United States to low-wage regions of the world. On the other hand, the U.S. economy has become increasingly service oriented, with service-sector jobs growing rapidly while manufacturing jobs decline. In the Columbus, Ohio, Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA), for example, the proportion of the work force employed in manufacturing dropped from about 29 percent in 1972 to about 19 percent in 1983. At the same time, general service increased by 6 percent, while the relative importance of finance, insurance, and real estate (collectively called FIRE), and state and local government also increased. Employment in FIRE has increased by 14,573 jobs during those 11 years, while transportation and utilities have added 1,789 new jobs (although actually experiencing a slow decrease in share of total employment). The shift to services does raise some serious questions about the long-term viability of a service-dominated economy. The service sector has traditionally been less productive and less high-paying than other parts of the economy. There are indications, however, that the service sector will see substantial improvements in productivity because of increased investment in technology, and will also boost wages. To meet the economic challenges of the future, it is necessary for the individual to maintain flexibility, or the ability to learn new skills. The primary responsibility of educators is providing access not only to new skills, but also to the tools of flexibility. Training cannot stop with high school or college; it must be an ongoing process, part of the cycle of human resources. (KC)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Ohio (Columbus)
Note: Paper presented at the meeting of Omicron Tau Theta (Columbus, OH, March 1, 1985).