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ERIC Number: ED252695
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Dec-1
Pages: 28
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Industrial Arts Education in the Future as Foreseen by Parents, Counselors, Board Members, and Administrators of Secondary Schools.
Buskirk, Don
A study of industrial arts curriculum priorities was conducted among parents, school board presidents, superintendents, and counselors of secondary schools in Nebraska in order to obtain information from non-classroom individuals who still had an impact on industrial arts programs in secondary schools. For the study, 10 well-accepted general industrial arts statements were broken down into 54 substatements that were carefully worded to include both traditional and futuristic terminology and content. Other items such as standards for programs, take-home projects, and name changes were also included. Study participants were asked to rate the items on a five-point Likert scale to indicate agreement on their inclusion in industrial arts programs. The top 10 substatements included (1) the study of conservation methods by industries, (2) the development of basic mathematics skills, (3) general use of tools, (4) industrial arts for all girls and boys in grades 7-12, (5) inclusion of other disciplines in industrial arts, (6) use of industrial arts for resource information for other occupations, (7) industrial arts as basic to other vocational courses, and the inclusion in industrial arts of (8) natural resources, (9) the environment, and (10) industrial advancement into the future. Other statements scored high by respondents included hands-on activities, the clustering of courses, a competency-based curriculum, and the use of samples or examples of industrial processes. Incorporating the results of this study into the industrial arts program can prepare youth for the world of work and provide a better understanding of human nature in a technological environment. (KC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Nebraska
Note: Paper presented at the American Vocational Association Convention (New Orleans, LA, November 30-December 4, 1984).