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ERIC Number: ED251969
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Sep
Pages: 24
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
School Improvement: What the Research Says.
Crandall, David P.
This paper, presented at the 1984 regional workshop of the Appalachia Educational Laboratory, draws upon recent research to list and debunk the following 10 "myths" about school improvement: (1) that change can be initiated simply by clarifying goals and designating staff (change actually requires three gradual steps--initiation, implementation, and institutionalization); (2) that improved instruction is costly (investment of time is actually more important than amount spent); (3) that practitioners don't know how to mount and maintain change efforts (research indicates, however, that they do); (4) that extended participatory planning is the surest path to school improvement (forceful leadership is essential); (5) that principals are the key to school improvement (central office administrators are generally more instrumental than principals); (6) that teachers will reflect innovations that they have not developed (simply untrue); (7) that small changes are safer and surer (true, but only major efforts produce serious improvement); (8) that materials, research findings, or new ideas by themselves will lead to change (practices are central, products are secondary, people are critical); (9) that inservice training is important only at the start (followup is essential); and (10) that successful innovations will stick automatically (not true, continual planning is needed). The paper closes with advice for school leaders on the importance of teachers in the change process, and a handout from the NETWORK, Inc., is attached, entitled "A Comprehensive Look at Efforts to Improve Schools." (TE)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: In: Sattes, Beth D., Ed. Promoting School Excellence through the Application of Effective Schools Research: Summary and Proceedings of a 1984 Regional Exchange Workshop. See EA 017 379.