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ERIC Number: ED251749
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Aug
Pages: 13
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
A Meta-Analysis of Sex Differences in Moral Development.
Blake, Catherine; Cohen, Henri
According to Gilligan (1982) there are two different orientations for describing moral development: a justice orientation characteristic of males, and a care orientation characteristic of females. Gilligan claims that the care orientation is confounded with the justice orientation in Kohlberg's (1983) conceptualization of Stage 3: mutual interpersonal expectations, relationships, and interpersonal conformity. In order to investigate whether female moral judgment development differs from that of males, a meta-analysis was conducted on data taken from four studies involving both standard and sexual moral dilemmas. Analyses consisted of sex diffrences in moral judgment development and in moral reasoning orientations, and the interaction of sex of respondent and type of dilemma used. The focus of each analysis was on the number of moral responses falling at particular stages of moral judgment development, and on the justice orientation for each study taken separately and for the pooled data. Sex differences were found at Stage 3 for three of the four studies analyzed separately and for the pooled data. Males between 10 and 48 years of age gave less moral judgments scored at Stage 3 than expected if gender does not influence scoring for stage of moral judgment development. The findings suggest that Kohlberg's theory and scoring system confound a care moral orientation with his conceptualization of Stage 3 on the justice orientation. Results are presented in charts and line graphs. (Author/LLL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Gilligan (Carol); Kohlberg (Lawrence)
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (92nd, Toronto, Ontario, Canada, August 24-28, 1984).