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ERIC Number: ED251018
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Apr
Pages: 25
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Building Bridges: Cooperative Projects for the Humanities and Business.
Jones, Thomas B.
The historical context of attempts to reconcile the humanities with business careers is discussed, and a number of cooperative programs that seek to link the two areas are described. Attention is directed to: faculty and student internships in business, executive-in-residence programs and executive institutes, career exploration programs for students, career development networks and consultations with business professionals, curriculum innovations and combined humanities/business majors, comprehensive cooperative strategies, and corporate training programs for liberal arts graduates. In the 1970s, business began to hire individuals who had specialized business training, and liberal arts learning and humanities were minimized in the business curriculum. However, business leaders were not satisfied with the writing, analytic, and communications skills of graduates, who had difficulty handling positions beyond the entry-level. In addition, career and public policy contexts were addressed in new broadened humanities programs. Programs linking the humanities to scientific/technological areas then attained prominence. Recommendations are included concerning strategies for future cooperative projects. (SW)
Office of National Affairs, Association of American Colleges, 1818 R Street, N.W., Washington, DC 20009.
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: National Endowment for the Humanities (NFAH), Washington, DC.; Association of American Colleges, Washington, DC.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at a conference sponsored by the Association of American Colleges and the National Endowment for the Humanities (Princeton, NJ, April 27-29, 1983). For related documents, see HE 017 872-878.