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ERIC Number: ED250740
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Apr
Pages: 39
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Effects of Evidential Information on the Perceived Outcome in Employer-Employee Decision-Making Situations.
Neal, Kay
An edited version of a 10-item instrument titled "Decision" was administered to 240 freshman students enrolled in speech courses to discover whether there were differential effects on the stability of a decision when the evidence used was fact or opinion and whether there were differential effects on the stability of the decision depending upon the sex of the persuader and persuadee in interpersonal decision-making situations. The instrument described 10 situations in which an individual with the power to make a decision had done so. The employer (persuadee) was then approached by the employee (persuader) who attempted to convince the employer to revoke or change the decision. Among the conclusions supported by the findings were the following: (1) the addition of opinion evidence during a persuasive attempt in an everyday situation decreased the perceived stability of the decision significantly as compared to no evidence; (2) the addition of factual evidence decreased the perceived stability of the decision significantly as compared to no evidence; (3) the addition of factual evidence decreased the perceived stability of the decision significantly as compared to opinion evidence; (4) the perceived stability of the decision with the addition of evidence did not vary significantly depending upon the sex of the persuader or the persuadee; and (5) there were no significant relationships between any of the factors of evidence, sex of the persuader, and sex of the persuadee. (HOD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Evidence
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Central States Speech Association (Lincoln, NE, April 7-9, 1983).