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ERIC Number: ED250711
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Rhetorical and Communication Theory: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1984 (Vol. 45 Nos. 1 through 6).
ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.
This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 19 titles deal with the following topics: (1) cinema, culture, and the social formation; (2) going beyond historical-critical dualism in the analysis of theoretical discourse; (3) empathy in instrumental communication; (4) a critical-comparative account of J. Piaget and N. Chomsky; (5) classical Chinese theory and practice of argument; (6) ambiguity as a mediator of choice shift processes; (7) use of Grunig's situational typology to predict qualitative as well as quantitative differences in information seeking; (8) the theory and application of Aristotle's enthymeme to discourse; (9) the mixed mode of dialogue; (10) Michael Arlen's aesthetic standards of television criticism; (11) Gricean pragmatics as rhetoric; (12) philosophical hermeneutics as a basis for rhetorical practice, theory, and criticism; (13) the apparent efficacy of the confessional experience; (14) rhetorical analysis of the paintings of Hieronymus Bosch; (15) Quintilian's theory of rhetorical education; (16) rhetorical mythology of the contemporary South; (17) a societal perspective on cognition and communication; (18) an analysis of the verbal and nonverbal codes in "Pogo"; and (19) a Burkean methodology for the rhetorical analysis of aesthetic communication. (HTH)
Publication Type: Reference Materials - Bibliographies
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.
Identifiers: Aesthetic Communication; Rhetorical Theory
Note: Pages may be marginally legible.