NotesFAQContact Us
Collection
Advanced
Search Tips
ERIC Number: ED250710
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984
Pages: 10
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Bilingual, Bicultural, and Bidialectal Studies Related to Reading and Communication Skills: Abstracts of Doctoral Dissertations Published in "Dissertation Abstracts International," July through December 1984 (Vol. 45 Nos. 1 through 6).
ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.
This collection of abstracts is part of a continuing series providing information on recent doctoral dissertations. The 13 titles deal with the following topics: (1) developmental differences in preschoolers' comprehension of WH-questions; (2) discourse analysis and early literacy in minority education; (3) effects of text structure on comprehension and recall in adult readers of English as a foreign language; (4) the writing proficiency of ESL and monolingual English writers at three grade levels; (5) language philosophy in composition theory and its pedagogical implications for native and nonnative English speakers; (6) comprehension skills of black and white good readers; (7) effects of sociodramatic play on language development of rural Appalachian kindergarten children; (8) teaching language arts and social studies in inner-city schools; (9) effectiveness of supplementary computer assisted instruction in reading; (10) math and reading anxiety among Mexicans, Hispanic immigrants, and Anglo-Saxon children; (11) cohesion in the writing development of native and nonnative English speakers; (12) the relationship between learning style and cognitive style in nontraditional college reading students; and (13) teachers' responses to children's use of nonstandard English during reading instruction. (HTH)
Publication Type: Reference Materials - Bibliographies
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: ERIC Clearinghouse on Reading and Communication Skills, Urbana, IL.
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Pages may be marginally legible.