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ERIC Number: ED250442
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Mar
Pages: 103
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Seat Belts Pay Off. The Use of Economic Incentives and Public Education to Increase Seat Belt Use in a Community. Final Report.
Campbell, B. J.; And Others
A six-month campaign to increase seat belt use in Chapel Hill and Carrboro, North Carolina centered around the idea of giving out economic incentives for seat belt wearing. The approach was to stop vehicles at random and give all belted vehicle occupants a small prize and a chance for a large cash prize. Precampaign activities involve collecting baseline seat belt use data and seeking support from community leaders. Incentives were obtained from a number of businesses, and decisions were made concerning incentive site selection, visibility at incentive sites, whom to stop, and the incentive transaction. Public information and education activities began three weeks prior to the incentive phase and continued during the campaign. The information was presented in the form of printed advertisements and radio and cable television public service announcements. For six months, incentives (valued at $3-$5) were distributed. Monthly $500 drawings were held, capped by a $1,000 drawing at the campaign's end. Weekly data collected during the incentive phase showed an upward trend in seat belt use. Follow-up is to continue for a one-year period, with continuing, though reduced, public education. Follow-up data collected two months after the campaign indicates that seat beld use had declined slightly. (Sample educational and promotional materials are appended.) (YLB)
University of North Carolina, Highway Safety Research Center, CTP-13, 197-A, Chapel Hill, NC 27514 ($5.50).
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: North Carolina Governor's Office, Raleigh.; General Motors Corp., Detroit, MI.
Authoring Institution: North Carolina Univ., Chapel Hill. Highway Safety Research Center.
Identifiers: Economic Incentives