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ERIC Number: ED250253
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Feb-8
Pages: 62
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Culture and Education in Micronesia.
Conklin, Nancy Faires
By focusing on social and cultural backgrounds of the five U.S.-affiliated Micronesian states, this document highlight issues that pertain to education in this region. The first sections deal with the political history of the region, emphasizing the period of U.S. administration from the 1940's to the 1970's. The history of instititonalized education is also outlined, describing political, economic, and demographic factors that affect the future course of Micronesia. The document then examines ethnographic research on the various cultures of Micronesia. Emphasis is placed on aspects of traditional culture which particularly have an impact on education: traditional learning structures; factors in communication and self-presentation; and attitudes toward authority, work, and cultural contact. Traditional leadership structures and status relationships, now competing with the cash economy and status through wealth and education, are also discussed. Separate subsections deal with each of the Federated States of Micronesia (Yap, Truk, Ponape, and Kosrae) as well as the Marshall Islands, the Republic of Belau, the Territory of Guam, and the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands. The final sections address education in Micronesia, including educational needs and areas for future research and development. A population chart and tables showing trends in urbanization, age distribution, the relationship among languages, and language spoken in the home are provided. A bibliography listing over 180 resources concludes the document. (LH)
Publication Type: Historical Materials; Reports - Descriptive
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Northwest Regional Educational Lab., Portland, OR.
Identifiers: Guam; Micronesia; Micronesians; Political History