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ERIC Number: ED249871
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982
Pages: 136
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-92-2-102973-5
Higher Education and Manpower Planning: A Comparative Study of Planned and Market Economies.
Fulton, O.; And Others
The experiences of seven European countries in the application of various manpower planning approaches and techniques to educational planning are compared. The countries are the Federal Republic of Germany, the German Democratic Republic, Hungary, the Netherlands, Poland, Romania, and Sweden. In four of the countries that have planned economies, the formation of qualified manpower is seen as a part of overall economic and social planning. In three of the countries that have market economies, greater emphasis is placed on adapting graduates to labor market needs after graduation. Attention is focused on the links between higher education, the labor market, and employment policy and, specifically, the issues involved in planning education that is concerned with satisfying both manpower requirements and the increasing demand for places in higher education. Reasons for and against manpower planning for higher education are described, along with a model for the review of manpower forecasting techniques. Instruments used to implement manpower-based plans for higher education are assessed. The following topics are also addressed: the growth of higher education since World War II, the changing role of higher education in Europe, the content of higher education, the role of lifelong learning, and female participation in college. (SW)
Publications Branch, International Labour Office, CH-1211 Geneva 22, Switzerland.
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Reports - Evaluative
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: International Labour Office, Geneva (Switzerland).; United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization, Bucharest (Romania). European Centre for Higher Education.
Identifiers: East Germany; Europe; Hungary; Netherlands; Poland; Rumania; Sweden; West Germany