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ERIC Number: ED249448
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Mar
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Differences in Grade Point Averages of Male and Female College Students Having Different Majors and Piagetian Operational Levels.
Crouch, Joyce G.
Piaget has suggested formal operations, as measured by his tasks, may be related specifically to physics-type problem solving and that other hypothetico-deductive thinking processes develop in adults in other specializations. The present follow-up study examined the relationship between formal versus concrete operational thinking as measured by two tasks (Chemical Mixing and Shadow) and academic performance of 46 science/mathematics majors (22 females, 24 males) versus other majors in three course categories: mathematics, science, and all courses combined. Science/mathematics majors made significantly higher mean grades in all three course categories. No significant differences between academic performance of concrete and formal operational groups were found when operational level was determined solely by performance on either the Chemical Mixing (determined by a verbal process) or the Shadow task (determined by a manipulative procedure. However, when the two performances were combined to determine operational level, formal subjects had significantly higher mean grades in mathematics/statistics. Significant sex x operational level and major x operational level interactions suggested that formal operations involved in the Shadow task is a positive factor for males but not for females, and that this type of formal operations may have a positive effect on mathematics grades of science/mathematics majors and a negative effect on mathematics grades of other majors. (Author/BL)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Concrete Operations; Formal Operations
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association (30th, New Orleans, LA, March 28-31, 1984).