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ERIC Number: ED249155
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981
Pages: 86
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Pottery from Peru. A Handbook. Second Edition.
Rammage, Alix
One of three handbooks dealing with pottery traditions from around the world, this packet draws together information about historical, ethnographic, and pottery traditions of Peru. The first of 13 brief subsections focuses on Peru's land and people. A presentation of a potter's history of Peru is followed by a discussion of the Chavin Cult (800 B.C.), known as the "period of the master craftsmen." Subsequent sections focus on characteristics and pottery styles of the Moche culture, the Nazca (100-800 A.D.), the Huari Empire (700-1100 A.D.), the Kingdom of Chimu (1100-1470 A.D.), and the Inca Empire (1430-1532 A.D.). A brief word about the Spanish conquest of Peru is followed by an annotated list and illustrations of interesting pottery forms. The next section introduces readers to pottery technology, including sources of clays and basic techniques used in pottery making such as block modelling, moulding, coiling, stamping, smoothing, painting, and firing. An examination of modern Peruvian folk pottery includes a look at traditions surrounding Peru's pottery, and differences between north coast and south coast pottery methods. The final section describes Spanish influences on Peruvian pottery. The first of three appendices lists Peruvian foods and recipes, followed by a list of resource materials and a workshop section, which includes step-by-step instructions for making a stirrup pot. The document concludes with a student map and worksheets which demonstrate techniques and ideas for working with clay. (LH)
Publication Type: Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Teachers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: City of Birmingham Polytechnic (England). Dept. of Art.
Identifiers: Inca (Tribe); Peru
Note: Developed by the Ethnographic Resources for Art Education Project and The Pottery Cultures Project. For related documents on pottery, see SO 015 940-942. Illustrations may not reproduce clearly.