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ERIC Number: ED248709
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Mar
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Developmental Patterns of Reading Proficiency in Adult ESL Students: Implications for ESL Classrooms.
Wilson, Marilyn
A study of the developmental patterns of reading proficiency of seven adult second language learners over a four-month period to determine the changes in their oral reading behavior and in their comprehension of written English is reported. The study looked specifically at oral reading and retelling. All subjects were beginning to low-intermediate level students of English as a second language (ESL) from a variety of language backgrounds. The stories selected were difficult enough for the readers to produce some miscues. Subjects read the stories orally, with no assistance from the teacher, and then retold them. The taped readings and retellings were then analyzed to determine proficiency levels and developmental patterns. Two specific hypotheses were addressed: (1) that ESL students would have some difficulty with the English inflectional system, and (2) that beginning ESL readers would make many miscues in oral reading but would decrease in miscues and increase the syntactic and semantic acceptablity of their reading. The first hypothesis was not borne out, since the forms used were classified as dialect miscues and not inflectional errors. The second hypothesis was borne out. Four conclusions are: (1) literacy acquisition in a second language is like that in a first language; (2) teachers must be aware of students' reading modes; (3) ESL students do not need to be totally proficient in English to become literate in it; and (4) when poor readers rely too much on graphic and syntactic information, their attention must be refocused. (MSE)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Revised version of a paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Teachers of English to Speakers of Other Languages (Toronto, Ontario, March 1983).