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ERIC Number: ED248522
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Dec
Pages: 22
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
The Business Writer's Audience Is Rarely a Fiction.
Hagge, John
Much current composition theory depends on the notion that writers represent reality--a situational context, an author, and an audience--in the text itself, and that readers construct their own representations of that text. Business writers, on the other hand, often direct their compositions to specific audiences, the members of which have participated in a shared situational context prior to writing. Since business writing facilitates an encompassing business transaction, business writers and readers--unlike most writers and readers of published prose--actually interact with one another. And because business writing develops from a particular situational context in which both writers and readers participate, it follows that business writers know something more about their audiences than do writers of published works; they can rely on variables in that context to produce meaning in their texts. Moreover, unlike authors of the published texts that are based on the work of composition theorists, business writers rely on personal knowledge of their readers through daily interaction or the exchange of texts. Finally, business writers often work collaboratively, and roles do not need to be fashioned for them or their readers since the situational context defines the text. (HOD)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Audience Awareness; Author Reader Relationship
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Modern Language Association (100th, New York, NY, December 28-30, 1983).