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ERIC Number: ED247936
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-May
Pages: 192
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: ISBN-0-949385-00-X
ISSN: N/A
The Network Nation: The Relevance of This for Possible Educational and General Public Administrative Structures and Strategies in the 1980's and 90's.
Freeman, Andrew R.
In this thesis, consideration is given to the interrelationships between a number of key concepts (devolution, decentralization, participation, consultation, coordination, and networking) and reports in educational and general public administration which have been produced over the last decade. Networking is the interconnecting concept. In the first half of the thesis, emphasis is on the current relationships between the key themes and educational and general public administrative structures and strategies. In the second half a variation of the "brainstorming" technique (involving purely the author rather than a group of individuals) has been used to produce a scenario of possible educational and general public administrative structures and strategies in the 1980s and 90s; this scenario emphasizes the possible interrelationships between these structures and strategies, the key themes, and communications networks. A case study then follows which links the key themes and the scenario by including discussion of one senior educational administrator's perceptions of probable futures for a particular education system. It is concluded that there is great potential for new technologies such as computer conferencing and data processing to assist with the restructuring of educational and general public administration. Recommendations on how this could be achieved are given. A list of descriptors and identifiers used in a computer search of ERIC for this thesis is attached. (Author/DMC)
Publication Type: Dissertations/Theses - Masters Theses; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Administrators; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Australia
Note: Master's Thesis, Melbourne University; Paper presented at the Silver Jubilee Conference of the Australian College of Education (Canberra, Australia, May 1984).