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ERIC Number: ED246360
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Apr
Pages: 14
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Influence of Adolescent Social Cliques on Vocational Identity.
Johnson, John A.; Cheek, Jonathan M.
While Holland's (1973) theory of personality types and vocational identity is widely used, the theory does not specify the developmental antecedents of the six personality types. To examine the relationship between membership in adolescent social cliques and vocational identity in early adulthood, four groups of college students (N=192) participated in the study. The first two groups generated a list of naturally existing cliques in junior high schools, and decided which cliques were similar to Holland types. Students then completed the Self Directed Search (SDS) and discussed the relationship between their previous clique membership, their SDS scores and their vocational aspirations. The third group identified their previous social clique and completed the SDS. The fourth group of students completed the SDS, the California Psychological Inventory (CPI), Cheek's Identity Scales (IS) and the Social Clique Membership (SCM) scale, a Likert scale denoting membership in six common social cliques. Results showed that all six cliques (Motorheads, Brains, Freaks, Socialites, Politicos, Conformists) were identified by each group of students, though not necessarily by the same labels. Knowledge of current school social structure confirmed the nature of the cliques. While analysis of test scores showed that clique types were not evenly distributed across Holland's types, the results indicated clear links between early adolescent cliques and later vocational identity. (MCF)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Vocational Identity
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association (Baltimore, MD, April 12-15, 1984).