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ERIC Number: ED246076
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Apr
Pages: 47
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Assessment of Study Activities as a Function of Demand Conditions.
Thomas, John W.; Curley, Robert G.
The study reports on the first of several investigations into the antecedents and consequences of students' study activities across junior high school through college years. The development and validation of a self-report instrument, the "California Study Activities Inventory" (CSAI) is described. The principal features of the instrument include items designed to assess routine studying versus test preparation activities; cognitive versus self-management activities; and variations in activities associated with the cognitive transformational and volitional latitude requirements of particular courses. Volitional latitude refers to the degree of structure which characterizes a course. Along the dimension of transformational requirements, courses can be classified with respect to how much students must originate and carry out procedures for making connections among the elements of information to be learned. The CSAI is developed as a device for examining relationships among course characteristics, student characteristics, study activities, and achievement. Patterns of study activity selection and use, it was found, differed according to the cognitive transformational and volitional latitude requirements of classes. Significant differences in students' study activities were found by grade, with older students showing more diverse and more appropriate strategies, given demand conditions. Interactions between grade level and demand conditions were found for particular items. (Author/DWH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: California Study Activities Inventory; Self Report Measures
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (68th, New Orleans, LA, April 23-27, 1984).