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ERIC Number: ED245763
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Apr-27
Pages: 34
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Faculty Commitment to Administrative Priorities.
Stengel, Jean Craig; Richardson, Richard C.
A study was conducted to examine the influence of administrative actions on levels of faculty commitment to administratively defined priorities. Previous research conducted in a large, urban, multi-campus community college district revealed four district goals: serving new clientele, strengthening developmental education, retaining students, and preparing students for entry-level jobs or improving job skills. In addition, seven administrative actions directed toward goal achievement were identified: planning, staff development programs, reorganization, reassigning staff, hiring new staff, evaluation, and resource allocation. A 62-item questionnaire, the Attitude Toward District Priority Inventory, was completed by 34% of the faculty members in the district (N=235), revealing their attitudes toward the four district goals, their perceptions of the administrative actions, and their self-reported participation in organizational activities. Study findings included the following: (1) faculty members who demonstrated the highest commitment to any of the four goals were involved in organizational activities and attended district staff development activities; (2) for three of the four goals (i.e., commitment to serving new clientele, developmental education, and occupational education), committed faculty members were more likely to be female than male; and (3) faculty members committed to developmental education, student retention, and occupational education perceived progress toward achieving these goals in the district. (HB)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research; Numerical/Quantitative Data
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: N/A
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New Orleans, LA, April 23-27, 1984).