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ERIC Number: ED245180
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Apr
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Ego Identity Status: Addressing the Continuum Debate.
Van Wicklin, John F.
From Erikson's (1968) psychosocial criteria of crisis and commitment, Marcia (1964) derived four ego identity statuses, i.e., achievement, moratorium, foreclosure, and diffusion. To explore antecedents of Erikson's ego identity construct, 130 college females completed a modified identity status interview, and questionnaires designed to elicit information about self-esteem, social desirability, and selected parent variables (e.g., acceptance, rejection, indulgence, approval). Hypotheses concerning the antecendent variables were derived from the theoretical formulations of Erikson (1968), Maslow (1970), and Coppersmith (1967). Analysis of results showed that only 2 of the 15 variables (paternal indulgence, and maternal nonenforcement of standards) failed to discriminate among identity statuses. In addition, the identity statuses could be significantly discriminated along two different dimensions. The first dimension, which accounted for about 68 percent of the variance, set achievers and foreclosures apart from moratoriums and diffusions. The second dimension, which accounted for about 26 percent of the variance, set achievers and moratoriums apart from foreclosures and diffusions. Although the sample did not broadly represent the adolescent population, the results suggest that Maslow's motivational hierarchy may be useful in determining the processes which underlie identity outcomes. The results also relate to the debate concerning which statuses are more stable or adaptive for women within particular social milieus. (Author/JAC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Ego Development Theory; Identity Formation; Social Desirability
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Eastern Psychological Association (Baltimore, MD, April 12-15, 1984).