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ERIC Number: ED245056
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Apr
Pages: 20
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
"Hi Heels and Walking Shadows": Metaphoric Thinking in Schools.
Barrell, John; Oxman, Wendy G.
Although theoretical work has been done on the nature of metaphors, there is little that deals directly with the use of metaphoric language in the teaching of regular school subjects. Yet it is clear that metaphors, and metaphoric thinking, may be used to great advantage in clarifying and elaborating on ideas, and in helping students to develop their critical thinking skills so that they can move from the concrete and the familiar to the abstract and remote. (Metaphoric thinking involves thoughts and ideas, and ways of looking at things, that are formulated and expressed in figurative language.) To foster their 10th-12th grade students' ability to use metaphors, a group of Newark, New Jersey teachers associated with Project THISTLE (Thinking Skills in Teaching and Learning) collaborated on a classroom research project on metaphoric thinking. After various experiments they designed and used a strategy in which students (1) explored the meaning of metaphors in everyday language, (2) analyzed more formal metaphors from their own subject areas, (3) created their own metaphors, first for familiar concepts and then for more abstract concepts, (4) created metaphors for subject-related concepts, and (5) evaluated the final metaphors in general classroom discussions. The experiment made it clear that metaphoric thinking is particularly useful in the development of critical thinking skills. (CMG)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Descriptive; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: New Jersey State Board of Higher Education, Trenton.
Authoring Institution: Montclair State Coll., Upper Montclair, NJ.
Identifiers: Content Area Teaching; New Jersey (Newark); Project THISTLE NJ
Note: Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Educational Research Association (New Orleans, Louisiana, April 1984).