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ERIC Number: ED244844
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1982-Oct
Pages: 28
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Citizenship and the New Federalism: New Roles for Citizens in the 80's? Conference Report on the Jennings Randolph Forum (1st, Washington, District of Columbia, May 16-18, 1982).
Two papers and four discussion highlights of a conference examining the impact of President Reagan's New Federalism on citizenship responsibilities are presented. The first of two background papers considers the historical context of citizenship and the New Federalism. Separate sections of the paper outline the notion of "the common good," the role of the nation and the state in protecting that right, the contrasting views of Aristotle and Hobbes on the role of the state, and the concept of state held by America's Founding Fathers. The second background paper provides a contemporary perspective on the New Federalism. The impact of the New Federalism on political institutions, businesses, the voluntary sector, educational institutions, and individual citizens is outlined. Highlights of conference proceedings consist of excerpts from the opening speech and general sessions which analyzed the background papers, citizen decision-making under the New Federalism, civic learning in the 1980's, citizenship and the role of the presidency, and the impact of the New Federalism on grassroots movements. The paper concludes with conference recommendations concerning civic values, civic knowledge and skills, and civic responsibility. Lists of conference speakers and attendees are appended. (LP)
Council for the Advancement of Citizenship, One Dupont Circle, N.W., Suite 520, Washington, DC 20036 ($5.00).
Publication Type: Collected Works - Proceedings
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Business and Society; New Federalism; Reagan Administration
Note: For related document, see SO 015 718. Photographs may not reproduce well.