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ERIC Number: ED244305
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Apr
Pages: 36
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
From Consciousness to Technology: The Implications of Wave Periodicity Research for Communication Studies.
Cooper, Thomas W.
Attempting to introduce a new viewpoint to communication studies, this speculative and philosophical paper posits technology as an "echo of consciousness." Section one examines technology as a manifestation of attitude, presenting the premise that technologies, consciousness, and systems are not separate components, but products of interacting processes. As a guiding paradigm, the formula V/F = A/T (vibration produces form as attitude produces technology) is offered. Section two presents evidence for and examples of transdisciplinary agreement with the author's views, calling on ancient Greek philosophy and Oriental cosmology, as well as modern technological history and architecture. The third section describes cymatics (the study of vibratory phenomena), and focuses on the work in this area of Hans Jenny, who conducted a wide variety of experiments to discover the relationship between sound vibration and specific substances. Section four discounts the theory that humans are controlled by the electronic media. Section five deals with the idea of the mass media as invented, maintained, and finally obsolesced by the compulsions and attitudes of the human organism. Section six suggests that technology is a broadcasting or expression of consciousness, that consciousness does not fully observe itself, and that consciousness requires a change in its state (rhythm, intensity, wave field) in order for the post Einsteinian world to be understood. (CRH)
Publication Type: Information Analyses; Opinion Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Cymatics
Note: An appendix consisting of xerox copies of 16 photographs from Hans Jenny's copyrighted book, "Cymatics," has been deleted because of the poor quality of reproduction.