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ERIC Number: ED244292
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1984-Aug
Pages: 27
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Supercharged Color: Its Arresting Place in Visual Communication.
Denton, Craig L.
For centuries artists have explored the uses of color in their compositions. Believing that colors have innate symbolic, expressive, and aesthetic qualities, artists have been aware that these properties can be magnified or subdued by organization within a compositional space, and artists have suggested that certain positions within a framed field are inherently advantageous or disadvantageous for the placement of color. Recently, investigators in Gestalt psychology have identified a phenomenon called "magnetism of the frame." The theory suggests that a frame has powers of attraction, and objects placed close to an edge, either inside or outside the frame, will be perceived as drawn toward the frame. Other research has shown that certain sections within any framed space have the potential to sharpen the visual effects of any object placed within those sections. This paper explores the effects of magnetism of the frame on color. The possible areas of investigation, the variables of color and compositional field that need to be addressed and controlled, and media tools and stimuli that could be used to test hypotheses are outlined. The ramifications for applied mass communication are surveyed. It is theorized that a frame can supercharge colors. This phenomenon could be employed in television news delivery, publication, or packaging design. In addition, the fact that the placement of color within a frame is crucial to effective color photography composition is explored. (Author/CRH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Gestalt Psychology
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Association for Education in Journalism and Mass Communication (67th, Gainesville, FL, August 5-8, 1984).