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ERIC Number: ED243131
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Nov-30
Pages: 15
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
A Comparison of First-Grader's Ability in Three Modes of Expression: Dictation, Independent Writing, and Story Retelling.
Froese, Victor
A study examined the transition from dependent writing (dictation) to independent writing for 40 first grade students. Specifically, the study investigated (1) how, in terms of common quantitative language units (mean words per t-unit, mean number of dependent clauses, words per maze, mean number of dependent clauses per t-unit, and length in words), the modes of dictation, independent writing, and retelling compare; and (2) how the aural comprehension elements (knowledge of character, events, and plot) in students' retelling transcripts may be described and compared both with each other and with the t-unit analysis. After the data were collected and the oral retellings transcribed, the dictations were analyzed for t-units, dependent clauses, mazes, and number of words. The retellings were assessed using the Reading Miscue Inventory Retelling Guide to indicate how well the student retold character, event, and plot information. Findings revealed little difference among the three modes of expression. The only differences observed were that retelling produced more mazes and that fewer words were produced in independent writing than in retelling or dictation. Dependent clauses were used very infrequently, with the fewest number used in independent writing and the most in oral retelling. The data on aural comprehension revealed that the retelling of events was the single best predictor of composition quality. (HOD)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Syntactic Complexity
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the National Reading Conference (33rd, Austin, TX, November 29-December 3, 1983). This research was partially funded by the University of Manitoba Research Board.