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ERIC Number: ED242830
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983
Pages: 46
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Migrant Differentials: An Examination of Social, Political, and Economic Dynamics of Life in the Receiving Area for Black Rural-Urban Migrants, 1915-1950.
Cruthird, J. Robert L.; Goodwin, E. Marvin
This is a report on a study of the motives of southern blacks for migrating to the North during the period 1915-50. In particular, the study examined whether attitudes that existed as a result of sentimental (rather than solely economic) factors involved in movement from the South encouraged an orientation toward the northern opportunity structure for certain status-levels of migrants. The data were drawn from approximately 500 case studies of elderly black residents of Chicago obtained over a three year period. After a review of the literature and an analysis of the "push-pull" model usually applied to black internal migration, the researchers divided a sample of 108 respondents in the case studies into lower, middle and upper status levels based on their family background, educational level, and style of life. The status levels were then related to the respondents' reported attitudes about relations between blacks and whites in the South, and their perceptions of opportunities in the North. Results of this correlation were somewhat inconclusive due to the small number of respondents classified as middle or upper status, but seemed to indicate that blacks at the lower status level migrated primarily for economic reasons, while blacks at the middle and upper status levels frequently had other motives, including socioemotional concerns, for relocating. (CJM)
Publication Type: Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Illinois (Chicago); United States (North); United States (South)
Note: Revised version of a paper presented at a National Endowment for the Humanities Summer Seminar (Madison, WI, 1983) and the Convention of the Association for the Study of the Life and History of Afro-Americans (Detroit MI, 1983).