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ERIC Number: ED242755
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Apr
Pages: 26
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Developmental and Sex Differences in the Early Mentions of Kindergarten through Twelfth Graders' Spontaneous Self-Perceptions: Implications for Educational Research and Practice.
Brinthaupt, Thomas M.; Lipka, Richard P.
Reactive scales dominate the self-concept field. Using these instruments leaves two questions unanswered. First, if left to his/her own devices would the individual even think of him/herself in terms of that dimension? Second, what are the dimensions in terms of which individuals do think of themselves? With these two questions in mind, 536 kindergarten through 12th-graders were asked the single question: "Tell me about yourself?" All statements in every student's protocol were analyzed on the basis of self-concept content, self-esteem judgments, and whether the mentions appeared early or late in the protocol. When the entire protocol was considered, trends emerged which are consistent with previous research on self-concept development. One of the numerous findings was support for an ontogenetic shift in self-concept characterized as: "I am what I own" to "I am what I do" to "I am what I am." All the findings were discussed by indicating ways for curriculum planners to respond to the data. (Author/PN)
Publication Type: Speeches/Meeting Papers; Reports - Research
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers; Administrators; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Protocol Analysis
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the New England Educational Research Organization (Rockport, ME, April 27-29, 1983).