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ERIC Number: ED242429
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Apr
Pages: 21
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
Mother-Daughter Relationships during the Latency Period: Communication, Affection and Activities.
Steinberg, Jill A.; And Others
A cross section of mother/daughter pairs was analyzed in order to increase understanding of the mother/daughter relationship during latency. In each pair, the daughter was 9 to 11 years old, and the mother was divorced or living with her husband and employed or at home full-time. A total of 41 pairs were recruited from after-school day care centers, Girl Scout troops, and other sources within an affluent southern sector of the San Francisco Bay area. Mothers and daughters independently completed parallel forms of a 29-item questionnaire measuring communication, affection, and shared activities. Four separate scores for each of the three variables were generated: one for the mother's self description, one for her description of her daughter, one for the daughter's self description, and one for the daughter's description of her mother. Overall, results indicated fairly high levels of perceived communication, affection, and activity from both mothers' and daughters' perspectives. More specific findings revealed that (1) mothers report the relationship to be somewhat better than do daughters; (2) age differences among daughters exist (e.g., 10-year-old girls were perceived as less communicative and less affectionate than girls 9 or 11 years old); (3) marital status of mothers had no impact on the three variables; and, in terms of specific items, pairs in which the mother was employed full-time generally enjoyed the most frequent exchange of communication and affection and involvement in activities. (RH)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Latency Age Children
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Western Psychological Association (San Francisco, CA, April 6-10, 1983).