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ERIC Number: ED241843
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Aug-28
Pages: 16
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Leader Legitimacy and Influence in Female and Male Groups.
Nochajski, Thomas H.; And Others
A leader's legitimacy through election or appointment has been found to create differing relationships with followers, resulting generally from greater expectations for an elected leader. To compare the authority and influence of elected and appointed leaders, 140 students were recruited to participate in research on "urban planning." They were organized into 35 four-person, same-sex groups. All subjects read a description of an imaginary city as background for a debate about urban planning programs emphasizing three problem areas: beautification, education, and welfare. Leaders were either elected or appointed. Low participators were given information supporting their position. Two kinds of dependent measures were used: (1) an observational measure, consisting of each individual's percentage of total group speech as an indicator of influence; and (2) the ratings of group members on a post-interaction questionnaire. Percentage of total group speech indicated significant differential effects of appointment and election on men and women leaders. Men held a higher percentage of speech under the elected conditions, while women did so under appointed conditions. Competence ratings yielded the same interaction pattern. The correlation of influence ratings with percentage of speech for appointed or elected leaders yielded significant sex differences; for females there were substantial positive relationships, while for males these were zero or negative. (JAC)
Publication Type: Reports - Research; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Researchers
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: Appointive Positions; Elected Positions
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Convention of the American Psychological Association (91st, Anaheim, CA, August 26-30, 1983).