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ERIC Number: ED240961
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Sep-20
Pages: 103
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Access to Student Loans. Hearing before the Subcommittee on Education, Arts and Humanities of the Committee on Labor and Human Resources. United States Senate, Ninety-Eighth Congress, First Session.
Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.
Hearings are presented on the proliferation of interstate guarantee arrangements in the area of student loans, and the effect of such arrangements on student access to loan capital. Topics include: the desirability of establishing territorial monopolies for student loan guarantee agencies, the views of the Higher Education Assistance Foundation and the United Student Aid Funds organization concerning the proposal to prohibit lending or guaranteeing loans across state borders, views on Utah's Law School Assured Access Program, and results of a study of the coordination of interstate activities in lending and loan guaranteeing. A primary concern of the hearings is whether state guaranteed agencies are meeting the borrowing needs of students, as specified in the Higher Education Act. Questions are raised concerning public accountability of private lenders, whether better services could be provided to the public through multiple guarantors in a state, and whether new proposals would erode participation by the smaller size lender. Additional topics include participation by United Negro College Fund colleges in the Citibank higher education assistance foundation program, and the role of the Law School Admissions Council in assuring that students accepted to law school will have the resources to attend. (SW)
Publication Type: Legal/Legislative/Regulatory Materials
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Congress of the U.S., Washington, DC. Senate Committee on Labor and Human Resources.
Identifiers: N/A
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