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ERIC Number: ED240635
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1983-Nov
Pages: 12
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
ISBN: N/A
ISSN: N/A
The National Issues Forum: Bridging the Human Gap through Innovative Learning.
McMahan, Eva M.
The National Issues Forum model, a series of community based public discussions on key domestic issues, may be a partial solution to the "human gap" between growing complexity and a capacity to deal with it, by exemplifying "innovative learning." To engage in innovative learning, characterized by anticipation and participation, individuals must be able to enrich their contexts, keep up with the rapid appearance of new situations, and communicate the variety of contexts through dialogue with other individuals. The goal of this innovative learning enrichment process would be to prepare people for citizen participation in democracy, through a problem/possibility orientation toward those domestic issues likely to occur in the communications era. Teaching this problem/possibility style requires (1) involving and enlisting the cooperation of people with divergent views of a problem, (2) teaching people to state the overall issue so that all viewpoints are fairly represented, (3) challenging people with divergent views to work together to define the relevant questions and issues requiring attention, and (4) developing a network to bring together competent people for long-term involvement in the decision-making process. Adapted to the speech communication classroom, the forum model would enable students to develop a style of learning and decision-making that is appropriate for the "communications era" of the future. (HTH)
Publication Type: Opinion Papers; Speeches/Meeting Papers; Guides - Classroom - Teacher
Education Level: N/A
Audience: N/A
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: N/A
Identifiers: National Issues Forums
Note: Paper presented at the Annual Meeting of the Speech Communication Association (69th, Washington, DC, November 10-13, 1983).