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ERIC Number: ED239936
Record Type: RIE
Publication Date: 1981
Pages: 72
Abstractor: N/A
Reference Count: 0
Learning to Love Your Computer: A Fourth Grade Study in the Use of Computers and Their Economic Impact on the World Today.
McKeever, Barbara
An award-winning fourth-grade unit combines computer and economics education by examining the impact of computer usage on various segments of the economy. Students spent one semester becoming familiar with a classroom computer and gaining a general understanding of basic economic concepts through class discussion, field trips, and bulletin boards. The 18-week unit then tied these economic concepts to computer usage as follows. Students examined: computers as suppliers of wants and needs and as solutions to labor problems (scarcity); computer technology's effect on the standard of living (economic goals); computers as capital goods (productive resources); the creation of a market for computers (market economy); financial uses of computers (financial institutions); computer related careers (circulation flow); increases in productivity through computers (resource extenders); the contribution of others to computer availability (economic interdependence); and deciding on computer use (decisionmaking). As a culminating activity, students developed an "economics quotient" test which was programmed for the computer and offered as part of an open house program. A program evaluation and bibliography are included. (LP)
National Depository for Economic Education, Milner 184, Illinois State University, Normal, IL (free).
Publication Type: Reports - Descriptive; Guides - Classroom - Teacher; Speeches/Meeting Papers
Education Level: N/A
Audience: Teachers; Practitioners
Language: English
Sponsor: N/A
Authoring Institution: Fort Smith School District, AR.
Identifiers: Interdependence; Supply and Demand
Note: Paper prepared at Fairview Elementary School for the International Paper Company Foundation's 19th Annual National Awards Program for the Teaching of Economics (1980-1981).